Young Hands Club

February 15, 2020

RMD review, Feb 8-14th, 2020

Filed under: Robinson Dorion — Robinson Dorion @ 8:00 p.m.

A couple surprises this week. The first was I filled more pages in my journal that I have in several months as I made an effort to become more aware of the less resourceful habits that are due to be replaced. I'd not accounted for this in my plan and pretty much everything but the presentations for the conference were dropped. The second surprise was the amount of time I invested in the research for the presentations.1 I re-read dozens of articles in the process of paring down the content for the 2 hour long presentations.

The problem as I see it is not the time I spent per se, but that I allocated the time "last minute", which resulted in emergency mode behavior, something I said last week that I didn't want to do.

A challenge I dealt with is related to coming out of the shadows. What I presented I've held to be true and shared with people in private, the stakes were raised with the public presentation, but in the end I'm pleased with the outcome and can build off overcoming that challenge. I received a lot of positive feedback from conference goers that are greener in the game and had not been exposed to the history. I also enjoyed the process of unloading from my headcase the history as I understand it, because a) it deepened/renewed my appreciation for TMSR and b) will result in blog material that will both stand on its own and further support the benefits of TMSR OS article.2

We have a verbal commitment from an attendee to start our training this year, optimistically in April or May, but he may be delayed till September based on his work schedule. Another said he'd be registering in the WoT, setting up a blog and exploring Eulora. I strengthened existing local relationships and made some new local contacts, the most promising recently left a major local private bank and is focusing on his own investments and independently brokering real estate and insurance. I see potential in him as both a client and referral source.

I did get some decent physical and language exercise and JWRD business development outside of the conference, but pretty much everything else was lost to the wayside. My journaling process ignited a review of some Jung, and I found a couple articles covering his approach to anxiety disorders and how to overcome them to be most insightful. They seem to further back the potential efficacy of my Master's "no shame" approach. Interestingly, when I was learning about sales, Shameless Shamus Brown's blog and sales training was the first mindset I found resourceful. Let's try that on this week.

  1. LaTex sources and pdfs available at http://dorion-mode.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/btc-history-{I,II}.{tex,pdf} []
  2. It's unclear if a series of articles or a mega article is a better choice. For the actual articles, I expect to put a lot more content because I'm not constrained to 2 hour long spoken presentations and I'll have to write what I said plus more. I guess the best strategy is to publish some outlines and ask for feedback. []

3 Comments »

  1. A couple surprises this week.

    Eh, they'll be less of a surprise as you get used to looking out and ahead for such things too. And gradually, as you start seeing them coming, they'll inform the plan too so it doesn't end up all falling by the wayside either. At any rate, no loss this week at all, quite on the contrary - it sounds like solid ground work that was quite overdue really and will pay off anyway.

    The problem as I see it is not the time I spent per se, but that I allocated the time "last minute", which resulted in emergency mode behavior, something I said last week that I didn't want to do.

    Your evaluation here is quite correct but do take the next step and consider that even this sort of "last minute" time allocation does *not have to* mean emergency mode where you silently drop anything/everything that doesn't immediately burn. When time gets suddenly and/or drastically reallocated, it's exactly the moment to act even cooler than usual: for one thing there may be at times small tasks that take very little of your time but still help keep non-burning areas moving too; for another, even if you have to drop some parts entirely, dropping them graciously rather than silently goes a long way really (even in allowing you to better focus afterwards on the rest) and it doesn't take much time at all to do right. What it takes is a lucid look at the reality in front of you and practice at speaking up timely on it, without any sort of shame in the mix either (quite the opposite since you'd be exactly acting to make the best out of an undesired situation which nevertheless exists regardless of whether spoken about or not).

    Interestingly, when I was learning about sales, Shameless Shamus Brown's blog and sales training was the first mindset I found resourceful. Let's try that on this week.

    You know, I followed your link there and tried to read that thing but couldn't get past the tidbits and soundbites and confused jumping about. What exactly is this mindset you say you got from that blog, can you summarise what it is?

    Also, what do you mean by "resourceful"?

    It's unclear if a series of articles or a mega article is a better choice. For the actual articles, I expect to put a lot more content because I'm not constrained to 2 hour long spoken presentations and I'll have to write what I said plus more. I guess the best strategy is to publish some outlines and ask for feedback.

    Good guess! Lolz, just come already with the outline(s) one day in #o and ask me, what are you still running away from?

    Comment by Diana Coman — February 16, 2020 @ 1:58 p.m.

  2. Lol the soundbites aren't the only thing that are "jumping about" The Shameless Shamus Brown blog has a shameless popup "can we plz email you" that I couldn't get to go away.

    I enjoyed reading the Academy of Ideas analysis of Jung though. The exercise of asking a close friend to give a description an honest description of yourself seems painful but useful. I may ask for that honest assessment from one of my two close friends who are visiting me in March.

    Comment by Will Haack — February 16, 2020 @ 6:27 p.m.

  3. @Diana Coman

    Eh, they'll be less of a surprise as you get used to looking out and ahead for such things too. And gradually, as you start seeing them coming, they'll inform the plan too so it doesn't end up all falling by the wayside either.

    I'll keep that in mind, which I think will lead to checking my optimist side with some realism.

    At any rate, no loss this week at all, quite on the contrary - it sounds like solid ground work that was quite overdue really and will pay off anyway.

    Yeah, overall I think it was positive. For sure many participants said they valued learning the real history.

    When time gets suddenly and/or drastically reallocated, it's exactly the moment to act even cooler than usual: for one thing there may be at times small tasks that take very little of your time but still help keep non-burning areas moving too; for another, even if you have to drop some parts entirely, dropping them graciously rather than silently goes a long way really (even in allowing you to better focus afterwards on the rest) and it doesn't take much time at all to do right. What it takes is a lucid look at the reality in front of you and practice at speaking up timely on it, without any sort of shame in the mix either (quite the opposite since you'd be exactly acting to make the best out of an undesired situation which nevertheless exists regardless of whether spoken about or not).

    Thanks for that, I see it and a part of my knows better when I go silent. I'll pay more attention to that and act it out.

    You know, I followed your link there and tried to read that thing but couldn't get past the tidbits and soundbites and confused jumping about. What exactly is this mindset you say you got from that blog, can you summarise what it is?

    Yeah, sure. When I started selling for the bank, I was running on a lot of passion and thought it was a no brainer for every prospect to become a client. This wasted a lot of time because I didn't properly qualify people. This blog and the sales course I ended up buying introduced me to the idea of making an ideal client profile. It helped realize that while it may be so that "everyone" would benefit from having an account there, not every client is profitable for the business of myself. With the ideal client profile established, the job of the sales person is to manage the sales process. Ask the questions to have to prospect voice that the service is of value to them and it's a priority to move forward. Then keep them to their word until the deal is done.

    By resourceful I mean the mindset helped me take some pressure off myself and at the same time become more profitable.

    Good guess! Lolz, just come already with the outline(s) one day in #o and ask me, what are you still running away from?

    Ok, will do. When I reflect on what there is to run away from, nothing significant comes to mind. I guess that question helps me step outside myself and be present.

    Will Haack When I went to the site this time around, nothing loaded without js. So I loaded the page in dillo (a browser with no js whatsoever) and was able to read without any popups.

    Re: Jung and associated exercise, nice and enjoy !

    Comment by Robinson Dorion — February 17, 2020 @ 7:24 p.m.

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